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Construction to start on new Oswego police station

Public invited to groundbreaking ceremony March 23 on Woolley Road site

Published: Thursday, March 9, 2017 4:40 p.m. CDT • Updated: Thursday, March 9, 2017 4:45 p.m. CDT
Caption
(Illustration provided)
An architect's illustration of the new Oswego police station to be constructed at 3355 Woolley Road, immediately east of the Oswego Fire Protection District Station 1.
Caption
(Illustration provided)
An architect's illustration of the new Oswego police station to be constructed at 3355 Woolley Road, immediately east of the Oswego Fire Protection District Station 1.
Caption
(Illustration provided)
An architect's illustration of the new Oswego police station to be constructed at 3355 Woolley Road, immediately east of the Oswego Fire Protection District Station 1.

The village of Oswego will host a groundbreaking ceremony for the start of construction on the new village police station at 10 a.m. on Thursday, March 23, at the new building site located at 3355 Woolley Road, immediately east of the Oswego Fire Protection District Station 1. 

Village President Gail Johnson, the Board of Trustees, Police Chief Jeff Burgner, members of the police department and village staff will be joined by the building’s design engineers, Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum Inc., as well as representatives from the consulting firm of McClaren, Wilson & Lawrie of Wheaton and the construction management company Gilbane Building Company to celebrate the ground breaking.

The public is welcome to attend the event. 

A new police facility has been a project in the making since 2008. This new facility is intended to be a public safety campus as well as have areas that will be available for public use. It is projected to open in the late summer of 2018.

The new station will replace the village’s existing police station, which was constructed in 1990-91 at 3525 Route 34, across from the Fox Bend Golf Course. The current station was constructed on the site of a former highway rest area that was donated to the village and the Oswegoland Park District in the 1980s. The site, however, is landlocked and lacks space for the construction of an addition or for the expansion of the building’s parking lot.

Village trustees voted unanimously last April to approve a $32 million bond issue that officials have said won’t raise residents’ property taxes. Instead, the $2.8 million in annual principal and interest payments will be made through the village’s home rule sales tax, which was increased Jan. 1 to a total of 8.5 percent. The sales tax is charged on select purchases in local stores and is paid by customers who live in the village and those who live outside the village but shop in the stores.

The sales tax increase is projected to generate $2.8 million annually, according to village documents.