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Features

Scenes from Sandwich’s past: Ice cream shop on Church Street

Herbert Johnson built this restaurant in 1941 at 400 E. Church St. and named it after his only daughter, Mary Ann. The business motto was “We Freeze to Please.” It was especially popular with high school students on their way home from school. The Johnsons sold the business and building in January 1947 to Clyde French, who ran it for seven years. It was then sold to Mavis Meade, who had the business for a few years when Max Bagg purchased it. After the building’s ice cream days, it became a beauty parlor and then eventually the Subway that is there today.
Herbert Johnson built this restaurant in 1941 at 400 E. Church St. and named it after his only daughter, Mary Ann. The business motto was “We Freeze to Please.” It was especially popular with high school students on their way home from school. The Johnsons sold the business and building in January 1947 to Clyde French, who ran it for seven years. It was then sold to Mavis Meade, who had the business for a few years when Max Bagg purchased it. After the building’s ice cream days, it became a beauty parlor and then eventually the Subway that is there today.

Herbert Johnson built this restaurant in 1941 at 400 E. Church St. and named it after his only daughter, Mary Ann. The business motto was “We Freeze to Please.” It was especially popular with high school students on their way home from school. The Johnsons sold the business and building in January 1947 to Clyde French, who ran it for seven years. It was then sold to Mavis Meade, who had the business for a few years when Max Bagg purchased it. After the building’s ice cream days, it became a beauty parlor and then eventually the Subway that is there today.

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