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Columns

Yesteryear: November in Oswego/Montgomery-area history

Members of the undefeated 1927 Oswego High School football team were: E.A. Rieckman, coach; Supt. John Clayton, manager; Warren Norris, captain; Robert Schmid; Raymond Colwell; William Lamb; Raymond Mitchell; Earl Heriaud; James Obman; Stanley Peterson; Maxwell Collins; Donald Gengler, Allen Schlapp; Franklin Pearce, Roswell Howard; Bernard Brown, Carl Hafenrichter; Frank Clausen, Donald Thompson; Melvin Leigh; Edwin Pierce, Alex Harvey; John Minnich; Orville Skeen; Arnold Bower; and Merrill Wolf.
Members of the undefeated 1927 Oswego High School football team were: E.A. Rieckman, coach; Supt. John Clayton, manager; Warren Norris, captain; Robert Schmid; Raymond Colwell; William Lamb; Raymond Mitchell; Earl Heriaud; James Obman; Stanley Peterson; Maxwell Collins; Donald Gengler, Allen Schlapp; Franklin Pearce, Roswell Howard; Bernard Brown, Carl Hafenrichter; Frank Clausen, Donald Thompson; Melvin Leigh; Edwin Pierce, Alex Harvey; John Minnich; Orville Skeen; Arnold Bower; and Merrill Wolf.

November 2002

In a 33-18 ballot Monday in Springfield, State Rep. Tom Cross of Oswego was elected by his Republican House colleagues as the party’s leader in the chamber. Cross succeeded his former political mentor Lee Daniels of Elmhurst, who chose to resign from the position after 20 years.

The Oswego School District Board authorized the district’s architectural and engineering firm, Batavia-based Kluber, Skahan & Associates (KS&A), to draw up bid specifications for the pad or “footprint” of a new, and as-yet unnamed, high school voters approved in balloting Nov. 5. The school board had earlier voted to purchase a 100-acre parcel at the northwest corner of Wolf’s Crossing and Harvey roads for the school site.

November 1997

By a decisive 4,051 vote margin, Kendall County voters approved a referendum that imposed a binding property tax cap on local governmental agencies. The cap limited those agencies – including local school districts – to annual tax levy increases tied to the rate of inflation up to 5 percent.

November 1992

The newest recruit for Oswego’s police force was “Braun,” a specially trained German Shepherd dog. Sgt. Larry Stefanski was assigned as the handler of the department’s new “K-9 Unit.”

Work was finished on a 300,000-gallon water tower in Oswego’s new Fox Chase subdivision west of Ill. Route 31. The tower was paid for by the subdivision’s developers. In addition to the water tower, the Ledger-Sentinel reported there were 12 new homes in various stages of construction in the subdivision, including five model homes fronting Ill. Route 31.

November 1987

Voters in the Oswego School District approved a building bond referendum to finance $14 million in additions to district schools, including $9 million for the expansion of Oswego High School. School officials had earlier obtained the results of a study that projected the school district’s enrollment would increase from about 4,000 to between 6,100 and 8,400 by 2000.

The Oswego Village Board extended its boundaries up to the south side of U.S. Route 30 at Douglas Road by annexing the Douglas Square shopping center. The board’s vote came four years after the Montgomery Village Board had voted to extend its boundaries south along Douglas Road to Route 30.

November 1982

Kendall County Sheriff-elect Charles McDonald told the Boulder Hill Civic Association Board he supported the reinstatement of the sheriff’s department-sponsored Boulder Hill Citizens’ Radio Patrol. “We need more eyes and ears up here [in Boulder Hill],” McDonald said.

November 1977

Organizers of the new Bank of Boulder Hill at the Boulder Hill Market announced plans to sell capital stock to local subscribers. A total of 40,000 shares were offered at a price of $25 per share, the Oswego Ledger reported.

Residents of Oswego’s Cedar Glen subdivision reported sighting an albino deer in the subdivision east of Ill. Route 25. Local officials believed the rare deer had left a herd that had been on the grounds at Argonne National Laboratory near Lemont.

November 1972

Richard Nixon didn’t have to worry about Kendall County in his bid for re-election as president in 1972. The ticket of Nixon and Vice President Spiro Agnew received 9,371 votes in the county compared to 2,527 for the Democratic ticket of George McGovern and R. Sargent Shriver.

A gallon of Meadow Gold milk was just 69 cents with a coupon at Paramount Heights supermarket on Ill. Route 31 in Montgomery, according to an advertisement in the Ledger.

November 1967

The Waubonsee Community College Board of Trustees authorized its attorney to negotiate the purchase of an approximately 195-acre parcel along the east side of Ill. Route 47 just north of Sugar Grove to serve as the new college’s permanent campus.

The Montgomery Plan Commission recommended the village board deny an application for a final plat of subdivision for units 7 and 8 of the Parkview Estates subdivision as submitted by K.L. Lewis Enterprises. The commission noted the property is “subject to flooding and no provision has been made for surface water drainage.”

November 1957

“It was planned to have an open house at the new East View School building for the November 12 PTA meeting but contractors are still puttering around,” the Ledger reported on Nov. 7. “The floor tile is still not on in the gym and it will be ten days to two weeks before it is finished.”

“How many of you know that it was just 125 years ago this fall that the first settlers came to Oswego?” Ledger editor Ford Lippold asked in the Nov. 28 edition. “There is a preliminary bit of planning going on for a 125th Anniversary celebration to be held next spring.”

November 1952

The annual Junior Frolic fundraising play produced by the junior class at Oswego High School presented three one-act plays performed on a competitive basis. Among the cast members of the freshman play were Lynn Bell, Butch Schillinger, Alice Shoger, Jim Turner, Loretta Powers, and Donna Ode.

The Oswego Panthers ended their grid season with a 27-12 win over Mooseheart to finish 8-1, with the only loss for the season to Lake Zurich in their opener.

A total of 166 students were enrolled at Oswego High School as of Nov. 20, 1952.

Denney’s Supermart in downtown Oswego was offering free home delivery of groceries. “Open every Wednesday night ‘till 9 o’clock,” said the Denney’s ad in the Ledger.

November 1947

The Kendall County Record reported on Nov. 19, 1947, that “The Oswego Legion post has purchased Augusta Shoger’s residence on Washington street.”

Montgomery Village Board members reviewed final plans for an addition to village hall on South River Street at Webster Street.

November 1937

The Montgomery Village Board approved a permit to Al Lebeau, owner of the Riverview Cafe at River and Webster streets, to install a curb in front of his cafe to “to act as a bumper for automobiles to keep them off the sidewalks,” according to the minutes of the board’s Nov. 1 meeting. During the same meeting, the board approved an emergency resolution to purchase a fire truck

November 1927

In a unanimous ballot, the Montgomery Village Board voted unanimously to have the village clerk notify the General Outdoor Advertising Company of Chicago to remove a sign board the firm had installed near the corner of River and Mill streets in the village’s downtown within 30 days. “At the lapse of the 30 days, it will be torn down by the village,” according to the minutes of the board’s Nov. 7 meeting. During the same Nov. 7 meeting, the board voted to donate $10 from the village’s Patriotic Fund to help Boy Scout Troop 16 purchase a troop flag.

“There was no football game between Hinckley and Oswego last Friday on account of the former team being quarantined at the time,” the Record’s Oswego High School correspondent reported on Nov. 2, 1927. “There will be a football game at the Oswego field Thursday afternoon at 3:00. Genoa and Oswego will play.” The Oswego team went on to play an undefeated 1927 season.

November 1917

The road officials of Kendall County had an all-day meeting at the court house Saturday. Present were four supervisors, 13 commissioners who took a lively interest in the program. The first topic to be discussed was “The Sixty Million Dollar Bond Issue.” This was ably handled by Supervisors I.V. Cryder of Lisbon and H.P. Barnes of Bristol. They were well versed on the subject. "What we are getting from the Federal Aid Fund” was discussed by Supervisors Ellie H. Jones of Seward and John Murley of NaAuSay. Mr. Jones read an exhaustive paper on the subject, which showed much study. Mr. Murley expressed himself as in favor of the federal aid fund, but that as Mr. Jones had covered the ground so completely he gave a talk on “Building Roads in the Early Days by Donation.” “Duties of the Town Clerk under the new Road Law” was handled by Superintendent John D. Russell, who outlined the duties of the clerk.

November 1892

Crime in Oswego was in the news. The safe in the Oswego Post Office was burglarized, according to the Nov. 30, 1892, Record. “The booty consisted of $1,500 in registered government bonds which were not negotiable; a number of notes; and $47.40 in cash,” the Record reported. “There is no clue to the perpetrators of the deed but there are a good many who would not be astonished to find out that local talent assisted in the matter.”

November 1882

On Nov. 16, 1882, the Record reported from Oswego that: “Mary Stockton, long ago and for a number of years the most important attachee to the National Hotel, that of head cook, was here during last week visiting with the old inhabitants of her acquaintance.”

Road work was in the Oswego news 135 years ago. Reported the Record from Oswego: “Quite an effort is now being made to put the entire Grove road in a lasting good condition by the use of stone and gravel.”

November 1877

On Nov. 8, 1877, the Record’s Oswego correspondent hopefully reported that: “Once more we have a newspaper of our own and a daily at that. Yes, the first number of the 'Oswego Daily Times' appeared his morning looking as tidy and acting as smart as a sweet sixteen meeting her lover. J.W. Stahl and F. Strossman are the publishers.” The paper was short-lived.

November 1872

The Record printed a listing of businesses in downtown Oswego that included Wollenweber and Knapp, livestock; D.M Haight, general store; E.R. Parke and Herman Tetzlaff, general [merchandise]; W.A. Hawley, general; Mr. Greenfield, furniture; Richards, Edson & Co., general; Levi N. Hall, apothecary; Lawrence Briggs, veterinarian; W.S. Bunn, lumber; Anton Miller, groceries; Coffin and Son, groceries; Henry Helle, boots and shoes; Mr. Sutherland, saloon and billiards; George Troll, saloon and billiards; M. Ivanchanden, barber shop; Mr. Seer, barber shop; Lorenzo Rank, postmaster and steamship line agent; H.C. Strothman, restaurant and confectionery; Drs. VanDeventer, Lester and Jewell; Fowler and Newton, justices; A.R. Snick, P. Hawley, A. Snook, lawyers; Gus Voss, insurance; Armstrong and Snook, meat market; Newton and Armstrong, manufacturing wooden wares (pumps).

On Nov. 28, 1872, the Record’s Oswego correspondent reported that “The Thanksgiving services will be held at the Baptist Church and Union prayer meeting in the evening at the Congregational; there is no regular programme about the eating of the turkeys.”

November 1867

On Nov. 7, 1867, the Record reported from Oswego that six brick and stone buildings known as the Union Block and located on the east side of Main Street between Jackson and Washington, opened. Built by Judson, Shepherd, Chapman, Greenfield, Richards, and Hall, the new buildings replaced the ones destroyed by a disastrous fire the previous Feb. 9.

“The old courthouse will be refitted and a high school made of it,” the Record reported from Oswego on Nov. 14. “Prof. Thorpe will be in charge.” The courthouse was located on the block bounded by Madison, Jefferson, Monroe and Jackson streets, the current location of the Oswego Community Bank. The county seat was removed from Oswego in 1864.

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