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Local News

Kendall County school district property tax revenues continue to climb

Kendall County Treasurer Jill Ferko points to parts of final settlement sheets Aug. 19 at the county's office building in Yorkville.
Kendall County Treasurer Jill Ferko points to parts of final settlement sheets Aug. 19 at the county's office building in Yorkville.

YORKVILLE – Kendall County school districts are seeing increases in money collected from property taxes compared with previous years.

Oswego School District 308, Yorkville School District 115, Plano School District 88, Sandwich School District 430, Lisbon Grade School District 90, Newark School District 66 and Newark High School District 18 all will see increases in their property tax extensions, the amount of money each taxing body gets, between $42,000 and $5 million for the 2018 tax year, according to Kendall County treasurer’s office data.

Oswego School District 308 is expected to collect the most money out of all of the districts within Kendall County for the current year, according to the data. The district, which also extends into Kane and Will counties, is set to collect $111,704,154.10 property taxi in Kendall County for the 2018 tax year, with the school district collecting more than half of that amount so far. That is more than $5 million than last year, according to the data.

Sandwich School District 430 had the highest percentage increase – 5.37% – in property tax extensions for the current year. They are set to collect $2,459,248.20 for the 2018 tax year, which is more than $125,000 than last year, according to the data. The district serves portions of Kendall, DeKalb and LaSalle counties.

Rick Schmitt, superintendent for Sandwich School District 430, did not respond to a request for comment Monday, Sept. 9, from Record Newspapers.

Kendall County Treasurer Jill Ferko said she doesn’t recall seeing any decreases in property tax money collected by local school districts in recent memory. She said the two things that would determine what property taxes may look like are the values of individual homes and the levies that are turned in by all of the taxing districts.

“Even though the value of your home might see a decrease, what the districts ask for ... has the ability to increase every year,” Ferko said.

Tax extensions going out to school districts typically make up about two-thirds of a homeowner’s property tax bill.

Tax extension increases for non-home rule taxing districts are limited under the Property Tax Extension Limitation Law, which is designed to slow the growth of taxing district revenues when property values and assessments are growing quicker than the rate of inflation. Extension increases are limited to 5% or the increase in the national Consumer Price Index for the year preceding the levy year.

“It doesn’t necessarily mean everyone’s tax bill is capped at that,” Ferko said. “The district’s levy is capped.”

Ferko said the CPI can differ every year. She said if everyone’s assessed values in that district go up, as well as each taxing district – such as school districts – increasing their levies, homeowners might owe more property taxes.

Ferko said her office always advises residents to do what they can to keep informed about how the tax levy process works for their local taxing districts. She said that includes going to school board and other taxing body meetings to learn about what they’re doing and how they’re spending taxpayer money, as tedious as that may sound.

“However, if you really want to understand and get to the bottom of why your taxes are going up, that’s what you need to do,” Ferko said.

• Northwest Herald reporter Drew Zimmerman contributed to this report.

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